Embodied Emotion Essay Paper

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  • Embodiment: The Mind Controlling the Body Essay

    864 Words4 Pages

    Embodiment

    The term embodiment refers to the body’s ability to control the mind, or the effect the body has on the mind. Instead of just the mind controlling how the body works and reacts, the body is thought to influence emotions, one’s psychological state, and other aspects of the mind.

    1 History

    1.1 Ancient Times
    Though yoga has been practiced since as early as 1500 BC, it was thought of more of a body-spirit connection until around 200 BC, when it became a focus of those who wanted relief from suffering (5). In 150 BC, the Yoga Sutras was published. It included beliefs on the power that yoga has on one’s mind (5).
    Ancient Greeks also played around with the ideas about the body’s influence on the mind. Plato, for…show more content…

    Embodiment

    The term embodiment refers to the body’s ability to control the mind, or the effect the body has on the mind. Instead of just the mind controlling how the body works and reacts, the body is thought to influence emotions, one’s psychological state, and other aspects of the mind.

    1 History

    1.1 Ancient Times
    Though yoga has been practiced since as early as 1500 BC, it was thought of more of a body-spirit connection until around 200 BC, when it became a focus of those who wanted relief from suffering (5). In 150 BC, the Yoga Sutras was published. It included beliefs on the power that yoga has on one’s mind (5).
    Ancient Greeks also played around with the ideas about the body’s influence on the mind. Plato, for example, believed that physical exercise was important for a healthy mind (1).

    1.2 16th and 17th Centuries:
    The views the Puritans had on the body greatly influenced the behaviors of the different genders. Puritans believed that one’s soul was protected by their body. Therefore, those who were weaker were believed to be more likely to have their soul taken over by the devil. As a result, women were viewed as the weaker gender in not only physical strength, but also spiritual strength. Women were not given opportunities to lead and were confined to the role of the caretaker of the children. They therefore generally became the more quiet, ashamed, and unhappy sex. Men then not only had more physical power, but also social power. (8)

    1.3

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